Web Design 101

This Old Website: Revisit or Redesign?

Posted February 24th, 2012 by Tim Lancaster | Web Design 101 | No Comments

Once upon a time McDonald’s homepage looked like this. Chevrolet called this their homepage. Compare that look to both companies’ current sites! (McDonald’s, Chevrolet) It can be hard to say whether sexy Flash interfaces, video intros, and animated navigation improve a visitor’s experience or simply waste time and bandwidth … but it’s clear that the web design has never stopped evolving, and design Obviously if your site is still using old-school HTML structures, tiled background .GIFs, and hit counters you’re probably OK with a retro style, but if you operate a commercial website that was designed a few years ago…

What is CSS?

Posted February 24th, 2012 by Tim Lancaster | Web Design 101 | No Comments

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a language used to style an HTML document. A typical website has a single CSS file that stores the styles for any given area of a website. In it’s simplest form, CSS can control font styles, such as; size, color, weight and font family. It’s main purpose is to enable a way to separate content from the design of a website or document. This code can be embedded in the <head></head> tags of an HTML document or used in an external file, which is preferred. HTML was never intended to have formatting. It’s intention was…

What Does XML Mean?

Posted February 24th, 2012 by Tim Lancaster | Web Design 101 | No Comments

So you’ve seen XML in the news lately? Asked yourself, what is XML? Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a computer language that allows a programmer to have flexible control over the structure, transportation and storage of data. XML doesn’t truly DO anything. There are no predefined XML tags. The programmer would name their own tags to describe the elements of the document. Then, the programmer would still have to design an application to send the details of their XML document. XML Example <letter> <to>Tim Lancaster</to> <from>James Morrison</from> <subject>Great website design information</subject> <content>I just read this great blog post at dogeatdogdesigns.com…

Standard HTML Page

Posted February 24th, 2012 by Tim Lancaster | Web Design 101 | No Comments

A standard HTML page consists of the following tags in this order: <html> <head> <title>Document Title</title> Head content goes here. </head> <body> Body content goes here. </body> </html> Add your content between the opening body and closing body tag to display in a browser. <html> <head> <title>Denver Web Design Instructional Video</title> </head> <body> <h1>How to program in HTML</h1> <p>A <i>quick</i> video on how to <b>program in HTML</b>.</p> <p>Second paragraph describing the page contents.</p> </body> </html> Some other example HTML tags include: <h1>Heading 1</h1> <h2>Heading 2</h2> <p>Paragraph Tag</p> <strong>Bold</strong> or <b>Bold Tag</b> <em>Italic</em> or <i>Italic Tag</i> <blockquote>Indents a block of text</blockquote>…

What is Flash?

Posted February 24th, 2012 by Tim Lancaster | Web Design 101 | No Comments

Although it’s possible to overuse, the ability to deliver multimedia, animate user interaction, and create complex effects make it a useful tool for a huge variety of websites. Working in Flash requires a diverse set of skills; graphic design, web design, animation, video, and programming experience are all necessary to craft a slick, efficient, and engaging elements. It generally takes more design time to present content through Flash than through a conventional HTML website, but a Flash presentation is completely interactive and infinitely customizable. Often times, a client will ask, “What is Flash?” or more common, “How can my website…